Tried & True Favorite Dahlia Varieties

Tried & True Favorite Dahlia Varieties

Come August, the dahlias get all of the attention on our farm. Dahlias are a very diverse type of flower: some varieties that have blooms as small as a quarter and others as large as a dinnerplate. We grow a wide range of varieties with varying colors and sizes, but our primary consideration is for plants that have long, sturdy stems, colors that are in demand for weddings and plants that are highly productive, pumping out blooms week after week.

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Our Workshops + Guest Teaching Events in 2019

Our Workshops + Guest Teaching Events in 2019

We get asked so often whether the farm is open to visitors and sadly the answer is usually no. Because we are such a small team (as in, just 2 of us most days), there is just isn’t time in the average day to properly entertain visitors. That is why I get so excited about our workshops because these are times when we love having visitors at the farm! This year we are hosting 6 workshops for our ‘On the Flower Farm’ workshop series and I’ll be guest teaching at several conferences in Western North Carolina.

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Favorite Sources for Seeds, Supplies, etc.

Favorite Sources for Seeds, Supplies, etc.

Winter on the farm follows a slower, less frantic pace than the rest of the year. I have a massive list of projects to complete before the pace picks up again in March, but there are no flowers to be picked or buckets to be washed. Nothing is urgent and its a feeling that I relish. One of the top priorities in winter is making sure my crop plans are in place, seeds have been ordered and supplies are fully stocked. Ordering seeds early is important to ensure that I get the varieties and quantities needed.

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My Favorite Zinnia Varieties + A Farm Update

My Favorite Zinnia Varieties + A Farm Update

This has been hands down our most challenging farming season yet. We knew that it would be inherently difficult because we moved the farm from our leased location in Candler to our new farm in Asheville (and moving a farm is not for the faint of heart), but between the weather and unforeseen circumstances, its been exponentially harder than we imagined.

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Tenacity: How We're Breaking Ground at the New Farm

Tenacity: How We're Breaking Ground at the New Farm

Spring has brought a blend of great progress and heartbreaking setbacks. Not only has the weather been some of the worst on record, the process of moving a farm is exponentially difficult. Going into 2018, I knew that this year will likely be the toughest I've lived thus far, so back in January I taped the word TENACITY onto my desk and repeat it as a mantra.

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My Top 6 Favorite Summer Flowers

My Top 6 Favorite Summer Flowers

Because today marks the first official day of spring and you're probably itching to get your hands in the dirt, I wanted to share my top 6 favorite summer flowers to sow now. Even though dahlias would definitely be near the top of my list, this list is focused on flowers you can easily plant from seed, whereas dahlias are grown from tubers. While in most areas its still too risky to plant any heat loving flowers outside yet, it is the right time to start these seeds indoors. 

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Flower Farming Books

Flower Farming Books

I love reading! Give me a good book over TV any day and I'm a happy gal. But sadly I don't have (or make) the time during the busy farm season to do much reading - probably because I fall asleep as soon as I sit down. So winter is my chance to catch up on all the reading that I daydream about during the summer. While historical fiction is probably my "escapist" reading of choice, winter reading is also about catching up on research and new ideas too. So here are some recommendations from this winter, plus all time favorites for inspiration and reference that have a permanent place at my desk.  

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Sweet Pea Seeding + A Giveaway!

Sweet Pea Seeding + A Giveaway!

Even though winter has been more severe than anyone predicted or hoped, I'm still full steam ahead with preparing for the coming season. The very first flowers that I seed in the winter are sweet peas. I have tried for the past 2 years to overwinter them in the field and in the hoop house, and both methods were unsuccessful - the vines were too damaged by wind and cold to recover, even under a layer of row cover.

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